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11-30-09 | Posted by


Beauty Drinks Bring New Glow to Skincare

By Editor-At-Large Dorene Kaplan

Glowelle 7_Day_Rasp_Jas_Kit

Glowelle’s Raspberry Jasmine 7-Day kit, sold at Neiman Marcus

Photo Credit: Glowelle

I don’t like strange foods. I used to consider myself an adventurous eater until I realized that just meant I liked Mexican food–and growing up in Los Angeles, that wasn’t much of a stretch.

Needless to say, I don’t eat okra or even Mexican hot chocolate—so when drinkable beauty products began flooding the market, I gave them the ole escargot heave-ho. But after meeting Kimberly Cooper, chief beauty officer of Glowelle, at last fall’s HBA Global Expo conference in New York City, I reconsidered the possibility of enhancing my appearance though a daily thirst quencher.

Drinkable beauty products have been popular in Japan for years, Ms. Cooper said, inspiring her to spearhead the 2008 launch of Glowelle, a Nestle company brand, in the U.S. The drinks are part of the global nutriceutical trend, which includes foods, like chocolate, jams and juices, that provide health and beauty benefits. According to market research company Euromonitor International, Japan and Western Europe account for the majority of global nutriceutical sales, while the category is still in its infancy in the U.S. Coca-Cola even sells a beauty drink in Japan and 11% of total supplements sold in Germany are beauty focused.

In general, beauty from within products contain formulations flush with minerals, vitamins, antioxidants and natural ingredients geared toward general or specific skin concerns.

Glowelle for example features a blend of green tea extract, lycopene, vitamin C, pomegranate extract, grape seed extract and beta carotene—all potent antioxidants. It’s said to nourish the skin, combat the signs of aging and even lift sprits by fighting free radicals. Flavor options include pomegranate lychee or raspberry jasmine in a ready to drink bottle ($7.00 for 8 oz.) or powder mix ($40.00 for a seven-day/$112.00 for a 30-day supply).

I tried the raspberry jasmine powder and found it fruity, sweet, light textured and much tastier than I ever expected, particularly if mixed with very cold water or juice. Package directions say to mix with 16 oz. of water, which can be altered to taste. Aligning itself with high-end beauty products, Glowelle is sold at Neiman Marcus and C.O. Bigelow NYC in addition to www.glowelle.com.

Borba_Water_Group

The four varieties of Borba Skin Balance Water. Photo Credit: Borba

Scott-Vincent Borba, an aesthetician and beauty marketer, glimpsed the future back in 2005 when he launched Borba Skin Balance Waters. Four different varieties target various skin concerns: age defying with açaí berry for aging skin, fine lines and wrinkles; clarifying with pomegranate for oily skin, clogged pores and impurities; firming with guanábana for smoothness, elasticity and nourishment; and replenishing with lychee for dryness, sensitivity and roughness.  

The price points of Borba are a little gentler than Glowelle’s. The 16 oz. Skin Balance Waters are priced at $2.99, while a 14-day supply of mixable packettes cost $28.00. Originally launched at Sephora, which no longer carries the Borba brand, the Skin Balance Waters, along with Borba skin-care products, can be purchased at retailers including Dillard’s, Saks Fifth Avenue, Ulta and QVC as well as at www.borba.com.

While Glowelle and Borba are two major beauty drinks on the U.S. market right now, smaller cosmetic/spa brands and supplement/nutriceutical companies have their offerings. Reportedly, mainstream beverage and food companies such as Kraft, Hansen and Jones Soda have been attracted to the category. Without a doubt, the recession has dampened the growth of drinkable and edible beauty drinks, which tend to be expensive.

Many beauty brands offer supplements, even L’Oréal has branched into the category with Innéov in Europe. In the U.S., www.skinstore.com sells capsule supplements from cosmeceutical lines like Murad, Perricone, and Dr. Brandt.

GliSODin_Skin_Nutrients_Detox_Formula[1]

The GliSODin Skin Nutrients Detoxification Formula mixable powder. Photo Credit: Isocell North America

GliSODin Skin Nutrients, also available at www.skinstore.com, is the brainchild of a Paris-based anti-aging and dermatology research lab. Among its offerings is the GliSODin Advanced Detoxification Formula, a mixable powder that removes toxins to promote clear and radiant skin. It contains berries and Chardonnay grapes to fight free-radicals, alpha lipoic acid, which chelates heavy metals, milk thistle to promote liver cleansing and broccoli for enhanced cleansing. The detox formula is priced at $125.00 for a 30-day supply.

Sibu

Sibu Beauty is sold nationwide at Whole Foods. Photo Credit: Sibu Beauty 

Sibu Beauty offers a liquid dietary supplement based on the sea buckthorn berry from the Himalayas in Tibet. Rich with fatty acids omega 3, 6, 7 and 9, sea buckthorn is said to support collagen production and promote healthy skin, hair and nails. Available at Whole Foods, Sibu is priced at $29.95 for 25.35 oz. The recommended dose is just 1 to 3 ounces daily.

Drinkable beauty is a trend to watch, particularly once the economy improves. The antioxidant ingredients in the drinks contain carotenoids and polyphenols, which in addition to fighting free radicals, also protect against UV-induced damage. No wonder that Euromonitor has identified sun protection from within as a trend to watch along with anti-cellulite edible products and men’s hair recovery supplements.

While the products I tested were for the most part tasty and drinkable, I still prefer the capsule form. As for beauty enhanced chocolate and jam, I’ll just have to wait till these options reach our shores for my evaluation.

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